News & Events

News

Digital Humanist to present Workshop, Seminar, and Public Lecture in February

Michael Gavin, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of South Carolina, is a scholar of digital humanities and British literature. He is the author of The Invention of English Criticism, 1650-1760 (Cambridge University Press, 2015) and numerous articles on a range of methods and practices in the digital humanities, including a recent article co-authored with Eric Gidal of the University of Iowa English Department: "Scotland's Poetics of Space: An Experiment in Geospatial Semantics" (Cultural Analytics). His current research asks how new forms of digital writing enable new ways of thinking and talking about literature, history, and geography. His own work ranges across computational linguistics, network science, geospatial modeling, and agent-based simulation.

Professor Gavin will be presenting his Workshop on February 22nd, and Seminar and Public Lecture on February 23rd. Please see the Events listing for more details.

PDH Students Present at BH and DH Conference

Bright and early on Saturday, September 23, Hannah Hacker and Jenna Silver-Baustian, current SLIS students and Public Digital Humanities Certificate scholars, presented at the Book History and Digital Humanities 2017 conference. This conference—a two-day affair convened by the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture at the University of Wisconsin-Madison—aims to study how digital humanities grows out of book history, how “bh” and “dh” continue to be mutually informative and generative, and how they also contradict each other.

“We were both extremely nervous since neither of us had presented at a conference before,” Hacker said.

Their presentation, entitled “Artists’ Books in the Digital: Interpreting 3D Rendered Artists’ Books in Libraries and Digital Humanities with Remake and SketchFab,” was the culmination of work started this past spring. During Spring 2017, Hacker and Silver-Baustian were in the same Visual Arts class together: Digital Approaches to the Study of Art. Both Hacker and Silver-Baustian work in Special Collections, and they both thought that 3D modeling for artists’ books in the collection would be a cool project to work on. After finding out about the BH and DH conference, they realized that they could present their work at a conference, too.

“So we started to meet up for coffee or brunch on weekends, and we would do research and work on the abstract together,” Hacker said. “A lot of caffeine and hard work was poured into that little abstract.”

Hacker and Silver-Baustian ran their ideas and abstract by several people, including Assistant Professor Bjorn Anderson, their professor at the time, who helped suggest programs and generating models for their project, as well as Mellon Postdoctoral Research Scholar Matthew Hannah and former Mellon Postdoctoral Scholar Christina Boyles. At the end of the semester, Hacker and Silver-Baustian finally submitted their project for the conference, and early that summer, they found out that they had been accepted.

Hacker and Silver-Baustian presented on 3D modeling of artists’ books for museums, libraries, and universities. During their panel, a range of topics were discussed, including 3D book modeling, digitization, and the digitization of medieval manuscript quires specifically.

Silver-Baustian discussed the different programs that could be used to create 3D models inexpensively. She did extensive research into free, open access programs that different institutions could use to make 3D models, and put a lot of work into experimenting with these programs and generating models, which were then shown during the presentation.

Hacker’s part of the presentation dealt with practical applications and theory. She discussed the pros and cons of 3D modeling artists’ books for libraries, museums and universities, and the implications of 3D modeling artists’ books in the field of digital humanities. She covered a range of topics, including access, preservation, conservation, interactive catalogs and exhibits, as well as 3D models as text and object.

Despite battling their nerves, Hacker and Silver-Baustian enjoyed the experience. “Once Jenna and I got up and began presenting, it felt really great,” Hacker said. “We had some really great reactions from the attendees, and the questions we were asked at the end of the panel were on point. Overall, it was definitely a worthwhile experience.”

For more information on the BH and DH Conference, click here.

Course List for Spring 2018 Added

Information for courses available for the Public Digital Humanities Certificate in Spring 2018 has been added, and can be viewed here.

If you see a class that you think would help you meet your digital humanities goals, please meet with your departmental advisor or contact our administrative office at pdh-certificate@uiowa.edu (link sends e-mail) to discuss.

Digitizing Mason City’s Architectural Heritage

This semester, students in Assistant Professor Lindsay Mattock’s Archives and Media course are working on a database project that engages with the notion of architectural heritage changing over time.

The project began in the summer of 2017, when the Office of Outreach and Engagement reached out to Professor Mattock with a proposal for a community outreach project with Mason City, Iowa as part of the Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities.

Mason City is a community with a strong architectural heritage. A publication from 1977, Mason City, Iowa: An Architectural Heritage, features this rich history. However, this historic architecture book was last revised over twenty years ago. This year, Mason City had a desire to update the text once again, but realized that there were some limitations to only having the information in the form of a print book.

Instead, the city decided they wanted to build out a database, which would allow for continual updates as time passes and more buildings are acknowledged as historic. The database could also be accompanied with a web-based application, which would provide access to the information and allow it to be shared with the community, both within Mason City and outside of it.

The project—like the Archives and Media course itself—is part archives/special collections, and part digital humanities. Mattock is working alongside thirteen graduate students (twelve SLIS students, and one Public Digital Humanities Certificate Scholar from a non-SLIS department) on digitizing Mason City’s architectural heritage.

Mattock, along with Travis Kraus, the Assistant Director of the Iowa Initiative for Sustainable Communities, helps facilitate the discussion between Mason City and the students. Mattock also provides the technological guidance for helping the students move forward with the database platform, and with building the web application.

The students themselves are the builders and designers of the database, as well as archivists. Mattock elaborated: “There’s kind of an aspect of preservation and access, and I think we’ll get into those conversations as we start to think about the sustainability of the project.” There is also an aspect of public engagement, and the idea of knowing your user.

“I see it as kind of an extension of all the things you’re learning in library school,” Mattock said. “But you get to do the hands on stuff.”image courtesy of Mason City, Iowa

In addition to gaining experience with engagement and outreach, the students are also working with a real-world dataset, and are developing their digital skills with databases and visualization. Because the project is grounded in the real world, and is working with real users that have real expectations, project management is especially important.

Mattock anticipates that they will accomplish building out the database and the website by the end of the Fall 2017 semester. The project might then be passed along to another course in another department that could further develop an application for the database, but the Archives and Media piece of it will be completed. Mattock expects to continue to serve as a liaison after the semester is over to help transfer the project to the community, as well as helping Mason City think about how they are going to move forward with the project.

This is the second time that Mattock has worked with the Office of Outreach and Engagement for a course. Despite the element of unpredictability that accompanies community outreach projects, Mattock believes them to be incredibly effective teaching aids.

“As a student, I always found it really rewarding when I felt like the work that I was doing was actually going to contribute to something larger. That it wasn’t just an assignment that I was completing for the term, but that it would have a life beyond that,” Mattock said. She has found that this kind of work, much like a database, “is a little bit more fluid and a little bit more dynamic than just working from a book.”

Architectural Heritage book cover courtesy of Mason City, Iowa

Public Digital Humanities Certificate

We are delighted to announce that another group of inspiring students has completed the Public Digital Humanities certificate! Congratulations to Stefan Schöberlein, Rebekah Walker, Claire Szeszycki, and Kara Wentworth, our newest certificate holders!

If you are interested in pursuing a Public Digital Humanities certificate, there is information available on our website or you can contact Matthew Hannah at matthew-hannah@uiowa.edu.

Spring 2017 PDH Course Options and Electives

Check out Spring 2017 course options to meet the Visualization requirement as well as elective choices.

Public Digital Humanities Capstone Presentations - Spring 2016

The first four PDH Certificate students to complete the program presented their Capstone Presentations on Friday, April 29th.

For his capstone project, Patrick Curtis worked with SLIS Professor Lindsay Mattock on Mattock’s Mapping the Independent Media Community project. Using a data set based on the Carnegie Museum of Art publication Film and Video Makers Travel Sheet (which aimed to draw attention to artists and their films and connect them with museums, universities, libraries, and other cultural heritage organizations) Curtis geocoded location information and created maps of artist and organization locations for future analysis, while exploring privacy implications of location mapping.

Ella von Holtum built a virtual 3D model of Megiddo, an ancient city featured in University of Iowa Professor Robert Cargill’s book, The Cities that Built the Bible. Von Holtum constructed Megiddo’s six-chambered gate, wall, and well, allowing readers to experience the ancient world digitally.

Emily Jones worked with staff in the UI Libraries’ Digital Scholarship and Publishing Studio and in Information Technology Services to add publication titles and create a new web interface for the Little Magazine database, which enables users to search by poet, work, and magazine.

Gemmicka Piper created a project about African-American fandom. She pulled materials out of UI Special Collections, posted them on Tumblr, and facilitated an online discussion.

To read more about the first cohort to earn a certificate in Public Digital Humanities, go here.

Course List for Fall 2017 Added

With fall enrollment already open, information for courses available for the Public Digital Humanities Certificate in Fall 2017 has been added, and can be viewed here.

All required courses are offered Fall 2017, and a small number of electives are pre-approved. If you see a class that you think would help you meet your digital humanities goals, please meet with your departmental advisor or contact our administrative office at pdh-certificate@uiowa.edu (link sends e-mail) to discuss.

Events

"Distant Reading at the End of the World: Big Data and The Hunger Games"

Fri, 02/23/2018 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm

UI Main Library Gallery

Michael Gavin's current book project explores the spatial distribution of language. Alternating between large-scale data analysis drawn from geographical writing and small-scale data culled from novels, Gavin tells the long history of how English has been used to organize knowledge about the planet, from the earliest printed atlases, through the meticulously detailed documents of Industrial Revolution, to Wikipedia, where millions of locales are described in more than 200 languages. The language of place is rich, varied, and tangled in a complex network of historical meaning. Against this background, Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games (2008-2010) narrates a spatially and lexically impoverished world where people are divided by stark boundaries and trapped in zones of terrifying experience. Using geographical information systems and natural language processing, Gavin explores the history of spatial description in novels, from Robinson Crusoe to The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, finding, in The Hunger Games, a powerful reflection of nationalism's twenty-first century contradictions.

Global Digital Humanities Symposium

Thu, 03/22/2018 - 1:00pm to Fri, 03/23/2018 - 6:00pm

Main Library, Green Room
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan

#msuglobaldh

Digital Humanities at Michigan State University is proud to continue its symposium series on Global DH into its third year. We are delighted to feature speakers from around the world, as well as expertise and work from faculty and students at Michigan State University in this two day symposium.

For the full program and schedule, as well as information about the keynote speakers, visit msuglobaldh.org.

Registration is still open!
Please register by: Friday, March 9
Free and open to the public. Register at http://msuglobaldh.org/registration/

Public Lecture: "Distant Reading at the End of the Word: Big Data and The Hunger Games"

Fri, 02/23/2018 - 3:30pm to 5:00pm

Location - TBD

Professor Gavin, Department of English, University of South Carolina, will present his current book project that explores the spatial distribution of language. Alternating between large-scale data analysis drawn from geographical writing and small-scale data culled from novels, Gavin tells the long history of how English has been used to organize knowledge about the planet, from the earliest printed atlases, through the meticulously detailed documents of Industrial Revolution, to Wikipedia, where millions of locales are described in more than 200 languages. The language of place is rich, varied, and tangled in a complex network of historical meaning. Against this background, Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games (2008-2010) narrates a spatially and lexically impoverished world where people are divided by stark boundaries and trapped in zones of terrifying experience. Using geographical information systems and natural language processing, Gavin explores the history of spatial description in novels, from Robinson Crusoe to The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, finding, in The Hunger Games, a powerful reflection of nationalism's twenty-first century contradictions.

For more information click here.

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL

Digital Humanities Seminar - Spatial Humanities and the Study of Literature

Fri, 02/23/2018 - 12:00pm to 2:00pm

Obermann Center Library (111 Church St.)

Join Professor Michael Gavin, Department of English, University of South Carolina, for a seminar revolving around readings drawn from the recent collection, Literary Mapping in the Digital Age(Routledge 2016), edited by David Cooper, Christopher Donaldson, and Patricia Murrieta-Flores. Focused on theory rather than practice, the seminar is designed for scholars with an interest in spatial analysis as a method for studying literature. For more information click here. Please register so that readings can be circulated in advance. Lunch provided.
REGISTER HERE

Introduction to Literary GIS - Digital Bridges workshop with Michael Gavin

Thu, 02/22/2018 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

1015A UI Main Library (Digital Studio Classroom)

Join Professor Michael Gavin, Department of English, University of South Carolina, for a workshop on the basics of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) for humanists. Participants will get hands-on experience in analyzing and mapping literary data. Click here for more information. Beginners are especially welcome. Please register in advance. REGISTER HERE

Digital Humanities and Multimodal Composition: An IDEAL Assignment Design Workshop

Mon, 12/11/2017 - 11:30am to 1:00pm

102 English Philosophy Building

Event presenter: Katherine Walden

PhD Candidate & Graduate Instructor, Department of American Studies - Sport Studies
MLIS Student, Certificate in Public Digital Humanities University of Iowa

Are you looking for new ways to engage your students with their assignments? Would you like to design purposeful ways for students to use technology in your classes? Any Instructor with an interest in digital humanities pedagogy or multimodal composition are invited to join IDEAL for a lunch workshop on adapting existing assignments or designing new assignments to incorporate digital or multi-modal components. Attendees will leave the collaborative, hands-on workshop with new ideas and the ability to implement them.

Lunch will be provided! Register today to reserve your spot: ideal.uiowa.edu/events/ (link is external).

Questions? Write to ideal@uiowa.edu (link sends e-mail) or stop by the Media Studio in 108 English Philosophy Building.

Doing Archaeology in a Digital Age: Bridging the Divide(s) between Data Collection, Interpretation, and Publication

Thu, 12/07/2017 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm

101 Becker Communications Studies Building

Please join us next Thursday, December 7 for our last Classics Colloquium of the Fall! Professor Derek B. Counts will be giving a talk titled “Doing Archaeology in a Digital Age: Bridging the Divide(s) between Data Collection, Interpretation, and Publication” at 5pm in 101 Becker Communication Studies Building.

With the emergence of affordable, robust, and mobile computing devices in 2010, archaeological data has increasingly become born-digital. Reactions have ranged from enthusiastic acceptance to outright skepticism, resulting in critical studies on the impact of digital technologies in archaeological fieldwork, interpretation and, especially, publication. The ability to disseminate digital data to a global audience threatens to destabilize the traditional stages of knowledge production in archaeology from handwritten paper documents, which have always defined the provisional character of field documentation, to the printed, bound publication, which has traditionally marked definitive results of research both accepted and expected by institutions. This paper explores issues surrounding “digital archaeology” and discusses the potential of digital publication media to transform the way we study (and access) the material past.

Workshop: Diversity and Digital Pedagogy

Tue, 11/07/2017 - 2:00pm to 3:30pm

UI Main Library Digital Studio Classroom

(1st Floor)

Professor Foreman will introduce the digital Colored Conventions Project, including valuable teaching resources and public engagement methods in this trans-disciplinary workshop open to graduate students, junior faculty, and others. The workshop will include a short presentation on what ColoredConventions.org (link is external) does and does not do, how we might incorporate it into teaching, and align it with our research. Professor Foreman will then lead a conversation about ways to use these materials and to advocate for digital projects in both undergraduate and graduate curricula. As part of the conversation, she will discuss way that graduate students and junior faculty in the humanities, in particular, can make digital humanities work legible on the job market and for tenure and promotion.

Register for the workshop here (link is external).

Lecture: "Colored Conventions and the Long History of Black Activism: Digital Organizing and Collective Recovery

Mon, 11/06/2017 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

UI Main Library Gallery

(1st Floor, North Entrance)

For more than half a century, nineteenth-century Black Americans advocated for justice in state and national "Colored Conventions." Why is such a continuous history of Black-led organizing and protest, one that features the most prominent writers, newspaper editors, speakers, church leaders, educators and entrepreneurs in the canon of early African American leadership known to so few? This talk by the faculty director of the Colored Conventions Project outlines the collective digital humanities work that has made the records and history of this movement freely available. It examines 19th century collective assertions for freedom and elucidates convention participants collective will to make real the self-evident: that Black education, Black voting and legal rights, Black employment, and Black claims to equal rights mattered then as they do now.

Workshop: Activist Game Design

Sat, 09/23/2017 - 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Grinnell DLab, Forum Building, 1119 6th Avenue, Grinnell, IA 50112

Interested in making games for social change? In this workshop, you will learn the mechanics of game design and how they can contribute to the ways we think about organizing and implementing activism. Methods include participatory design, culturally relevant education, and utilizing archives. Interactive media and games will be showcased to highlight a framework of speculative design and how we can create change through our imagination. Register here (link is external).

Alexandrina is a game designer, community-based researcher, and media artist who believes in the possibilities of the decolonial imaginary using digital media as an emancipatory tool. Her most recent game, The Resisters, was an alternate reality game she designed through participatory research with young people of color about local social movement history in Providence, RI. Before joining WPI, she earned her Ph.D. from the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism at the University of Southern California and an M.A. from the College of Ethnic Studies (link is external) at San Francisco State University, where she researched adolescent girls of color and their race and gender identity development through online doll play. Alexandrina utilizes principles of self-determination and relevant education in her teaching and research. She teaches at university and high school levels, and specializes in digital media skill building with young people of color. She is a co-chair of Situated Critical Race + Media (SCR+M!) of FemTechNet (link is external), a multi-university collaborative feminist technology organization. She is the Futurist for the Latinx Pacific Archive and is working on developing a line of ovulation-tracking jewelry that is both affordable and flawlessly stylish. As a community-based researcher and participatory designer, her speculative work is still anchored in lived experience. She works closely with New Urban Arts (link is external), a youth art studio and imagination incubator. Alexandrina uses critical pedagogy and community-based research as platforms to work with institutions, community organizations, researchers, and artists. Her research has received funding from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-John E. Sawyer Seminars, the Teagle Foundation, the Rhode Island Council of the Humanities, and the Voqal Fund.

Sponsored by Digital Bridges for Humanistic Inquiry, The Grinnell College English Department, & the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; with additional thanks to the Grinnell Digital Liberal Arts Collective, Burling Library, and the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Iowa.

Presentation: Designing in Detail: Creating Community-Based Interactive Media

Fri, 09/22/2017 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

Burling Library Lounge, Grinnell College, 1111 Sixth Ave., Grinnell, IA 50112

How can interactive media supplement and support social justice movements? Alexandrina Agloro, media artist and assistant professor, will discuss the mechanics of game design and how they can contribute to the ways we think about organizing and implementing activism. She will discuss her game, The Resisters, and its relationship to participatory design, culturally relevant education, and archives. Other interactive media and games will be showcased to highlight a framework of speculative design and how we can create change through our imagination.

Hosted by Digital Bridges for Humanistic Inquiry (link is external)

Public Digital Humanities Capstone Presentations Spring 2017

Fri, 04/28/2017 - 2:30pm to 3:30pm

Becker Communication Studies Building 101

Please join us for the second Public Digital Humanities Capstone Roundtable. University of Iowa graduate students completing the PDH certificate will present their final capstone projects, the culmination of a semester of innovative digital scholarship, and will discuss the role of digital scholarship in the 21st-century university. This year features impressive scholarship as students use digital tools to explore unique insights into culture and literature.

For his certificate capstone project, Stefan Schoeberlein collaborated with the editors of Walt Whitman's journalism to assess the authorship of sets of short newspaper pieces that could have been written by the poet of Leaves of Grass. To this end, Stefan has employed a distant reading method based on a statistical comparison of bootstrapped lists of "most frequent trigrams" (strings of 3 characters) that relies on three distinct measures of distance and uses the plugin "stylo" for the computing language "R." His project promises to unearth new journalism by the famous poet.

Rebekah Walker’s project utilizes geographic information systems (GIS) methods to visualize the spatial association of American Indian populations to public and tribally-controlled libraries in the United States. Using the robust annual public library data available through the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and United States Census Bureau demographic data, she created an interactive web map and accompanying narrative website to contextualize disparities in information access for these populations.

For her capstone project, Kara Wentworth joined the team at the Walt Whitman Archive’s Correspondence Project. Over the semester she has applied her skills with 19th century handwriting and learned the Archive’s standards for XML (according to TEI guidelines) to transcribe and encode letters from Whitman’s “Old Age Correspondence” era. To date she has encoded 21 letters to contribute to the project. In her presentation, she will discuss the unique challenges in encoding and deciphering these hand-written letters.

Claire Szeszycki accessed Iowa Carnegie library data from the University of Iowa CLIP website and transformed this information into a series of maps using Leaflet. Further research and mapping has been done on Indiana and Illinois Carnegie libraries to compare these three similar states and their Carnegie history. Her maps offer functionality in which users can select a Carnegie library to see data about the library.

BH and DH: Book History and Digital Humanities 2017 Conference

Fri, 09/22/2017 (All day) to Sun, 09/24/2017 (All day)

Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Call for Individual Papers and Complete/Partial Panels

Proposals due to printculture@slis.wisc.edu by April 15, 2017

Decision Notification by May 15, 2017

http://www.wiscprintdigital.org/conferences/

Often celebrated and criticized as the next big thing in humanist research and teaching, “the digital humanities” get a lot of press for shaking up the way things are done. But is “dh” a continuation of some of the most “traditional” scholarly work in the humanities: bibliography, textual criticism, and book history? This conference, convened by the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, aims to study how digital humanities grows out book history, how “bh” and “dh” continue to be mutually informative and generative, and how also they contradict each other.

This conference is an occasion to think broadly and provocatively about fields and formats – to trace these genealogies and debate their meaning, to think about what difference it makes to position the hand written or printed word on a continuum with digital inscription rather than insisting the latter is a clean break from the former, and to broaden views about whose labor – intellectual and physical – makes all kinds of reading, writing, and scholarship possible.

The organizers welcome proposals for papers, entire panels, partial panels (to be filled in with individual paper submissions), posters, or other forms of presentation from scholars and practitioners in all fields that have claim to these questions: literature, history, religious studies, librarianship, information studies, area and ethnic studies, computer science, feminist, gender, and sexuality studies, digital studies, library and information science, art history, preservation, forensics, curation, archival practice, and more.

Organizers: Jonathan Senchyne, Heather Wacha, Mark Vareschi

Questions to: printculture@slis.wisc.edu

Mapping Time with Timemapper

Thu, 12/08/2016 - 3:00pm to 4:45pm

Main Library 1015 A

Timelines are important components of humanities education and research. Whether charting the transmission of knowledge or the march of history, timelines allow us to visualize vast periods of time into easy-to-read infographics. With this workshop, we will create our own timeline visualizations using Timemapper, a free and accessible timeline software. The skills you learn here will allow you to assign your students new explorations into the humanities and social sciences.

Free but registration requested. No technical expertise required.

Discussion of the Graduate Certificate in Public Digital Humanities

Fri, 10/21/2016 - 2:30pm

3082 LIB

Prof. Jim Elmborg will be holding a meeting for those students currently enrolled in or interested in the PDH certificate. This meeting will be informal and is intended to address questions about admission, course offerings, and the capstone.

If you cannot attend the meeting, but have questions or concerns you’d like to discuss, you can email Prof. Jim Elmborg and schedule a time to talk. You can also pass your questions along via students who might be attending.

Rare Books and Manuscripts Section Digital Special Collections DG at ALA Midwinter 2017

Mon, 10/31/2016 (All day)

The Digital Special Collections Discussion Group is seeking proposals for short presentations of 7-12 minutes that highlight case studies, success stories, and failures on the topic: "Using Digital Humanities Tools in/for Special Collections."

Possible ideas include: tools in the context of projects evaluating Special Collections for use within the Library, tools used in class visits and/or scholarly collaborations with Special Collections, or research projects using Special Collections.

Digital Humanities tools may include (but are not limited to): Neo4j, Omeka, OpenRefine, Palladio, Scalar, Tableau, Voyant, Zotero, topic modeling tools, open graph visualizations, etc.

The Digital Special Collections Discussion Group meeting will take place on Sunday, January 22, 8:30am-10:00am. Meeting location TBA.

Proposals should be submitted using this form, and are due by the end of the day on October 31, 2016.

Global Digital Humanities Symposium

Thu, 03/16/2017 (All day) to Fri, 03/17/2017 (All day)

Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan

Find information and updates at http://digitalhumanities.msu.edu/

Free and open to the public. CFP and further details will be forthcoming in the next few weeks.

This day and a half symposium looks to continue in the critical and global spirit of examining digital humanities established at the inaugural Global DH Symposium in April 2016 (find out more at http://msuglobaldh.org/).

Collaboration-First: New Pathways for Scholarly Production

Fri, 09/16/2016 - 10:30am to 12:00pm

117 UCC, International Program's Commons

All are welcome—no registration required

“Collaboration” has been a byword of digital scholarship very nearly since its inception. The complexity of producing digital works requires scholars to work closely with designers, developers, digital librarians, and editors. Often, however, collaboration happens fairly late in the research and publication process, well after the scholar’s initial idea for the project, usually after she has completed the bulk of her research, and sometimes even after she has decided on the final format for the research, whether that’s a book, an article, an Omeka instance, or a Scalar interactive. All too often, collaborators are brought on board merely to implement scholarly projects, not imagine them. Greenhouse Studios: Scholarly Communication Design at the University of Connecticut aims to change this status-quo. A transdisciplinary collective, Greenhouse Studios reframes the practices, pathways and products of scholarly communications through inquiry-driven, “collaboration-first” approaches to the creation and expression of knowledge. With start-up funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Greenhouse Studios draws on art and design processes and the speaker’s prior experiments in radical collaboration to solve the problems and explore the opportunities of scholarship in the “digital age.” This talk will present the history and meanings behind this rethinking of scholarly communications and explore some directions for future research.

Workshop: Managing Collaborative Humanities Projects: Lessons from DH - REGISTRATION REQUIRED

Fri, 09/16/2016 - 2:30pm to 4:00pm

Executive Boardroom, 2nd floor 2390 UCC

Registration required—limited to 20 participants

“Managing Collaborative Humanities Projects: 10 Lessons from Digital Humanities”
Drawing on the instructor’s 15 years of digital humanities practice, this workshop will consider both the practical, day-to-day work and the intangible aspects of managing collaborative projects and organizations. Pragmatic lessons will include picking projects, building partnerships and engaging stakeholders, attracting funding, budgeting and staffing, setting milestones and meeting deliverables, managing staff, publicity and marketing, user support, sustainability, and the range of tools available to support this work. The workshop will also consider several harder to pin down, but no less important, aspects of management, including communication, decision making, and leadership.

Videogame Shakespeare: "Play the Knave"

Wed, 09/07/2016 - 4:00pm to 5:30pm

University of Iowa Main Library
125 West Washington Street
Iowa City, Iowa
Library Commons

Videogame Shakespeare: “Play the Knave,” sponsored by the Digital Bridges team at the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies. Free and open to the public, Professor Gina Bloom (English Dept., UC Davis) and her collaborators created the Play the Knave video game to draw audiences of all ages into the world of Shakespeare’s play. The game will be installed at the University of Iowa Library Commons. Public participants are welcome to become avatars and play the game in person. Professor Bloom will also give a public lecture that speaks to the general public, high and middle school teachers, and college instructors. The talk discusses opportunities for humanities scholars and teachers to integrate the humanities into STEAM initiatives, offering Play the Knave as a successful case study. http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-36076442(link is external) For other Shakespeare events: http://shakespeare.lib.uiowa.edu/events/

Shakespeare at Iowa

Mon, 08/29/2016 - 10:00am to Sun, 09/25/2016 - 5:00pm

University of Iowa Main Library
125 West Washington Street
Iowa City, IA

Join the Shakespeare at Iowa celebration and exhibit with Shakespeare's First Folio, a rare book of all Shakespeare's plays, printed in 1623. Please note the exhibit end hour may change.